Personal Injury

Understanding The Consequences of Amputation

Posted by on Jul 19, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

No news can be more devastating than being informed that you will have to lose a limb. For the person who will lose a leg or hand, the following days will be the toughest. Amputation is associated with various changes that could impact the amputee for the rest of their life. According to the website of Cazayoux Ewing Law Firm, the consequences of losing a limb can be catastrophic not only for the individual but also for their families.

While no amount of money can replace a lost limb, the amputee and their family must slowly accept the changes that will come into their lives. Acknowledgement can be difficult but the support of the family can play a huge role in the amputated individual accepting the hard fact that he has lost a limb. There are various consequences that can arise from amputation and here are some of them:

Psychological Effects

The amputee will suffer psychologically from their new condition. Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, MD, points out the five different stages that the amputed individual will go through: 1) denial and isolation 2) anger 3) bargaining 4) depression and 5) acceptance. Aside from that, the individual may also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Emotional Consequences

The emotional effect of amputation is dependent on the age, type of loss, and the cause of amputation. The individual will experience increased negative thoughts, negative feelings, physical pain, and feeling of helplessness.
The loss of limb may also have an impact on the amputee’s self-identity and self-esteem. Amputation can result to a long-term problem with an individual’s self-image. These changes can also include a higher degree of anxiety and depression, lower self-esteem and less satisfaction with life and appearance. They will also develop a feeling of revulsion with their family as well as with society.

Social Consequences

Amputation will also have a negative effect on the sexual and social relationship of the individual. They will resort to social avoidance and isolation.

People who have just undergone amputation will need the support of their family members and friends. Showing empathy, fear, and helplessness will do no good and will only prolong acceptance by the amputee. Instead they should show strength, hope, and optimism.

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Common Causes of Airplane Accidents

Posted by on May 13, 2015 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

Airplanes are often considered completely safe and are usually acknowledge as one of the most convenient ways to travel. These assertions are backed by data from Aviation Safety Network (ASN). According to a recent industry report, air travel is currently at its safest—tallying only 3.2 accidents for every million departures. Considering that an overwhelming 2.9 billion people have ridden planes in 2012, it’s easy to see that the rate of airplane accidents is considerably low.

Despite trends pointing towards the assurance of air travel safety, it is still important to keep in mind that accidents are hard to account for. Despite the declining rate of air plane accidents, the possibility that something can go wrong is hard to completely eradicate. This is particularly true considering that airplane crashes and accidents are typically caused by factors that are harder to predict and foresee. Issues with inclement weather, for example, usually play an important part in most airplane accidents. An editorial by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) concludes to this fact as it tries to analyze the 2014 disappearance of AirAsia QZ8501.

In particular cases, air plane accidents can also be caused by some form of human error and negligence. Pohl & Berk, LLP point out that most of these crashes are typically caused by airline negligence, mechanical failure, pilot error, pilot intoxication, and air traffic control error.

The infrequency of airplane accidents proves that these incidents are easy to prevent and avoid. Airlines and other similar organizations need to be held accountable for any decision or misstep that may cause harm to their passengers. Similarly, the family of victims involved in such crashes can seek out several legal remedies to ensure that this accountability is maintained. One such option is to file a personal injury claim.

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Common Car Accident Injuries: First Aid for Broken Bones

Posted by on May 12, 2015 in Personal Injury, Vehicle Accidents | 0 comments

The personal injury law firm Ravid & Associates, P.C. points out on its website how common car accidents are in the United States, reporting that millions of incidents occur each year. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than 2 million people injured in motor vehicle accidents during the year 2012. One of the most common injuries suffered by these individuals is broken bones or fractures. While these injuries aren’t usually life threatening, the severity of a fracture can worsen without immediate medical attention. As such, it’s important to take note of certain first aid measures to ensure that these injuries are addressed while waiting for help to arrive.

The bones in our body can only stand a certain amount of force. Any more than that will cause it to give way and break. A fracture happens when a substantial amount of forces causes a break of any size. Physicians categorize fractures into many different types, but the most general categories refer to how the fracture presents itself. A displaced fracture happens when a bone breaks and the pieces shift and are misaligned. On the other hand, non-displaced fractures are characterized by a broken bone that retains its natural alignment. Simple or closed fractures happen when a bone breaks with no punctures or open wounds. Broken bones that pierce through the skin are called compound or open fractures.

Before administering first aid, look out for the visible signs and symptoms of a fracture. Broken bones will lead to very intense pain with significant bruising, swelling, or bleeding in the affected area. It can also cause the injured area to look misshapen or feel numb. Emergency medical attention is crucial in cases that involve compound fractures or heavy bleeding. The Mayo Clinic then recommends taking the following steps while waiting for help to arrive:

  • When the fracture involves an open wound, stop bleeding by applying pressure using sterile bandages or clean pieces of cloth.
  • Make sure the injured area is immobilized as much as possible. Don’t try to move or realign any bone that’s sticking out.
  • When the fracture is minimal and only results in swelling and bruising, apply ice packs to the skin to help ease pain and discomfort.
  • If the injured person is feeling faint or breathless, help them lie down with their head slightly lower than their body. If it’s possible, try to elevate their legs.

While bone fractures are easier to manage than other injuries resulting from car accidents, they can still cause great discomfort and translate to a long time in recovery. According to the website of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C. ®, these injuries can also cause financial burdens. This is particularly true for severe fractures that require physical rehabilitation. The website of the Milwaukee car accident lawyers at Habush Habush & Rottier emphasize that these burdens can be properly compensated by at-fault drivers through proper legal channels.

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