Understanding The Consequences of Amputation

Posted by on Jul 19, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

No news can be more devastating than being informed that you will have to lose a limb. For the person who will lose a leg or hand, the following days will be the toughest. Amputation is associated with various changes that could impact the amputee for the rest of their life. According to the website of Cazayoux Ewing Law Firm, the consequences of losing a limb can be catastrophic not only for the individual but also for their families.

While no amount of money can replace a lost limb, the amputee and their family must slowly accept the changes that will come into their lives. Acknowledgement can be difficult but the support of the family can play a huge role in the amputated individual accepting the hard fact that he has lost a limb. There are various consequences that can arise from amputation and here are some of them:

Psychological Effects

The amputee will suffer psychologically from their new condition. Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, MD, points out the five different stages that the amputed individual will go through: 1) denial and isolation 2) anger 3) bargaining 4) depression and 5) acceptance. Aside from that, the individual may also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Emotional Consequences

The emotional effect of amputation is dependent on the age, type of loss, and the cause of amputation. The individual will experience increased negative thoughts, negative feelings, physical pain, and feeling of helplessness.
The loss of limb may also have an impact on the amputee’s self-identity and self-esteem. Amputation can result to a long-term problem with an individual’s self-image. These changes can also include a higher degree of anxiety and depression, lower self-esteem and less satisfaction with life and appearance. They will also develop a feeling of revulsion with their family as well as with society.

Social Consequences

Amputation will also have a negative effect on the sexual and social relationship of the individual. They will resort to social avoidance and isolation.

People who have just undergone amputation will need the support of their family members and friends. Showing empathy, fear, and helplessness will do no good and will only prolong acceptance by the amputee. Instead they should show strength, hope, and optimism.

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